Youth Empowerment

Proof that #Youth Leaders in #California Have Heart, Service and Art

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There are many forces that encourage today’s youth to seek happiness through consumption of products, substance, and ideas. We are enthused to celebrate these teen leaders who have been recently awarded a Youth Rising Program Grant. We salute the way they work to channel their energy for increasing critical consciousness, beauty, and unity in their communities.

Agustin Barajas-Amaral The Cultural Appreciation Art Project Oakland, CA

The Cultural Appreciation Art Project is an art project for Oakland Youth at the Urban Promise Academy. The art project will allow youth to plan, illustrate and display multi-ethnic cultural imagery that celebrates cultural similarities and differences to help youth to create a safer community where cultural differences are celebrated and similarities recognized.

Through this project, youth and their parents will recognize ethnic diasporas and move away from stereotypes of race. They will see the intersectionalities of race where we recognize Black Arab, Afro Latinos, etc; The project’s first goal is that youth will create and hold deeper friendships and relationships with one another, youth, and adults.

Lyndsi Zapata Siza Los Angeles, CA is a Los Angeles based, debut, dance company. The momentum of our country’s political climate gives Artistic Director Lyndsi Zapata, much reason to put her creative craft to work. The company will perform and communicate through dance, while touching on issues of today that must have light cast on them.

More here.

Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) Turn City Youth Into Artists

Art by Lajachanae Minter of East English Village Preparatory Academy is on display.  Rachel Woolf, Special to the Free Press

Art by Lajachanae Minter of East English Village Preparatory Academy is on display.  Rachel Woolf, Special to the Free Press

Kenneth Holloway never saw himself as an artist. But then his teacher, Gloria Byers, challenged him to create a piece of artwork using corrugated cardboard, a selfie, pastel chalk and other materials.

The result: A colorful self-portrait using mixed media that was so good, it was selected to be on display during the Detroit Public School Community District Student Exhibition at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

"It feels good to let people see my work, to see that it means something," said Holloway, 17, a senior at Osborn College Preparatory Academy.

His artwork is one of hundreds of pieces on exhibit beginning Saturday at the DIA, an annual display that gives students a unique opportunity to showcase their talent.

It's the 80th such exhibition at the museum, and is the longest-running partnership the DIA has with an educational organization. The Detroit Public Schools Foundation and the Ruth T.T. Cattell Education Endowment Fund funded the exhibition.

Follow the link for more photos and additional info.

Bakery Internship, Art Program Create Safe Haven for Youth After Election

swtgeneration : To our youth - black, Latino, Muslim, LGBTQ, female, immigrant,  In our classroom, there are no walls and your life matters. Men cannot grab you, you are not a terrorist, drug-dealer, rapist. Your sexuality and gender will not be questioned or persecuted.

swtgeneration: To our youth - black, Latino, Muslim, LGBTQ, female, immigrant, 
In our classroom, there are no walls and your life matters. Men cannot grab you, you are not a terrorist, drug-dealer, rapist. Your sexuality and gender will not be questioned or persecuted.

EAST VILLAGE — Sweet Generation, a First Avenue bakery with a social justice streak, is using its internship program to give city youth a voice and a safe haven after an election that has left them fearful, the shop's owner and founder said.

The bakery's RISE youth internship, which recruits youth aged 16 to 24 from city schools and nonprofit groups to work in the shop while participating in career training and workshops, most recently teamed up with Lower East Side arts organization Fourth Arts Block to create a mural on the storefront's metal pull-down gates.

The mural reflects the students' hopes and dreams for the future — including landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower from a student striving for a career in architecture and a cupcake from an aspiring pastry chef — but also reflects the students' desire for peace and unity, which has come to the forefront of discussion since the presidential election, said bakery founder and owner Amy Chasan, pointing to the peace sign emerging from the mural's painted clouds. 

"That's where the peace sign came from, just that desire for harmony," explained Chasan, who said her students, all minorities, had expressed fears for the future in the wake of President-elect Donald Trump's victory and the reported uptick in hate crimes.

"In this mural project is when the youth started opening up about how it impacted them and how they thought about this city, which they love a lot," said Chasan. "I think what a lot of them felt, and it's what we hear from this generation, is it's really frustrating that bigotry like this exists and there’s no reason for it — why can't people just be themselves and everybody be OK with that?"

"It’s scary to think about being in a place where they aren’t safe, where they feel hate and exclusion."

Chasan has taken to the business's social media to reinforce her commitment to serving her students and making her bakery a safe place for them.

Click here for the full article on DNAinfo.

#Publicolor: Art classes let youth address police brutality

Police Brutality. Art by  Weird Chief .

Police Brutality. Art by Weird Chief.

NEW YORK (FOX5NY) - Art classes are helping at-risk students find a path to a brighter future. Who owns the solutions of tomorrow? I heard about an interesting program that might hold some answers and had to check it out.

Publicolor, a long-term development program focused on addressing the needs of minority students from some of New York's poorest neighborhoods, is tackling the topic of police brutality. I went to the Manhattan offices to join the conversation and to rock the boat of thought.

They are in high school or fresh out. They recently finished the program's Summer Design Studio on the Pratt University campus.

Click here for more from Fox5News.

Photos from our #Artivist Workshop at #TheDoor - Downtown Manhattan, NYC

We were once again invited by The Door to conduct an Artivist workshop. The Door is a non-profit organization that empowers young people by providing comprehensive youth development services in a diverse and caring environment, allowing them to gain the necessary tools to help them become successful in life. 

Check out some of the creations from the workshop!


Would you like to host one of our Artivism workshops at your school or non-profit? We would love to hear from you! Contact us!

Since 2011, Project Attica has brought Artivism – a free, dynamic, visual art, interactive workshop to students in New York City. Held in middle schools, high schools and community organizations in the city, Artivism provides students with a space to create works of art by expressing their views about social justice issues on wearable canvases.