art exhibit

Youth Art Will Be on Full Display for #SoulBasel in #Overtown

Screen Shot 2017-11-26 at 2.55.37 PM.png

MIAMI – Each year, Art Basel spans three continents and on December 7-10, 2017 it will grace both the shores of Miami and the Historic African American Overtown Community as it does annually.

And youth from Urgent, Inc.’s Rites of Passage, FACE (Film, Arts, Coding & Entrepreneurship) and After School Programs will showcase their talents as part of the Soul Basel experience in Overtown, with, “Our Voice Matters,” a  multi-media collection of art, photography, film and more.

This exhibition is made possible thanks to The Children’s Trust, The Black Archives History and Research Foundation, Greater Miami Convention and Visitors Bureau and Miami Dade County.

The voices of youth made possible through the arts will be celebrated for 3-days featuring the work of young artists and filmmakers ages 5-21, and their grandparents too.

The festivities are open to the public, for more information visit here. If you go:

  • Opening Gallery Reception- Thursday, December 7, 3-6pm at the Historic Ward Rooming House Gallery, 249 NW 9th St, Miami, FL 33136. Includes a guided artwork, interactive Photo Booth and youth entrepreneur pop up shop. Presented in partnership with The Black Archives History and Research Foundation.
  • Youth Film Night- Friday, December 8, 4-7pm on the first floor of the Cambridge Innovation Center (CIC), 1951 NW 7th Avenue, Miami, FL  33136. Includes youth film screening, popcorn and drinks for $5.  Presented in partnership with Florida Film House.

Community Arts Day- Saturday, December 9, 1-4pm at the Historic Ward Rooming House. Includes a fun-filled afternoon of spoken word, dance, music, art project and so much more.  Presented in partnership with Path to Hip Hop.

Arts Council of Southern #Indiana exhibit showcases work of at-risk youth

Screen Shot 2017-11-26 at 2.52.51 PM.png

NEW ALBANY — Today marks the start of a month-long art show in New Albany exhibiting the works of at-risk youth as they work through trauma with art.

Kentuckiana's Inspired Building Bridges opens to the public today at the Arts Council of Southern Indiana in New Albany, featuring the portraits of community leaders, painted by students at Maryhurst, a private non profit agency that cares for more than 400 children and families each year, according to a news release.

The annual show, in its eighth year, has been hosted at different cultural spots each year; past locations include the Muhammid Ali Center and the African-American Heritage Museum.

The program pairs the kids with local leaders for interviews and photos the children then use as a marker for painting the portraits. The project not only gives children who may have experienced trauma a creative outlet, but seeks to inspire them by showing them their potential in the community.

Exhibit showcases art of #NativeAmerican youth

For more than 35 years, the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center has supported our next generation of indigenous artists with the annual Native American Student Art Show. The event encourages students to express their personal creativity while reflecting upon their deep-rooted history and traditions. This juried art show is open to Native American students in grades Pre-K through 12.

For more than 35 years, the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center has supported our next generation of indigenous artists with the annual Native American Student Art Show. The event encourages students to express their personal creativity while reflecting upon their deep-rooted history and traditions. This juried art show is open to Native American students in grades Pre-K through 12.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – An exhibition opened today that shows off the creativity of New Mexico’s Native American young people.

The Native American Student Art Show is an annual event featuring works from K through 12 students across the state.

Any Native American student can submit a piece and winners are chosen by a jury.

Some of the art is also for sale, with proceeds going right back to the students.

The show is in the 38th year. This year’s theme is “The Power of Stories.”

“It’s a Native-relevant topic and so it’s something they can come together and kind of think about and put themselves down on a piece of paper saying ‘this is what I think about storytelling.’ or ‘this is a story that means a lot to me’ and I want to share that,” said Rachel Moore, curator at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center.

The show runs every day from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. through January 5 at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center on 12th Street near Menaul.

More here.

Former foster youth share stories of resiliency

Jamie Lee Evans, director of the Foster Youth Museum, introduces the speakers at the foster youth panel held on Sunday at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History. (Lucjan Szewczyk -- Santa Cruz Sentinel) 

Jamie Lee Evans, director of the Foster Youth Museum, introduces the speakers at the foster youth panel held on Sunday at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History. (Lucjan Szewczyk -- Santa Cruz Sentinel) 

SANTA CRUZ >> The difference between walking out of foster care empowered and walking out having sustained lifelong injuries could be as simple as the homes in which you were placed. But the uniting factor that brought several former foster children to speak out about their experiences on Sunday was resiliency.

During the Fostering Resilience event held at the Museum of Art and History, panelists from California Youth Connection opened up to discuss how they found their way.

The panels and accompanying art activism workshop and youth-led performances tie into the larger theme of the foster youth experience explored by the museum’s “Lost Childhoods” exhibit on life inside the California foster care system. For at least one of the panelists, Summer Rae Worsham, 21, just being able to come and see the exhibit was something to cross off her bucket list.

“There is a lot of stigma around foster youth — they are bad, they are not going to amount to much — all these statistics packed against us,” Worsham said. “I challenge people to do the research, experience foster kids and learn what they have been through.”

It is exactly this message that some of the attendees took to heart and walked away with.

More here.

What’s #FosterCare Like? An #artexhibit shows us through the eyes of youth that lived it

Screen Shot 2017-11-03 at 2.13.10 PM.png

A San Francisco Bay Area museum is taking an unusual tack with an exhibition about foster youth in California. The Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History invited a team of former foster youth and advocates to help put the show together.

Five months before the show Lost Childhoods went up, around a hundred former foster youth and advocates began meeting at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History to talk about what the exhibition would look like.

Community engagement director Stacey Garcia explains, “We are not experts in what foster youth have gone through, what they want to share. We know how to make an exhibition, but we don’t know how to tell their story. They do.”

Jess Prudent works as an outreach assistant with Court Appointed Special Advocates of Santa Cruz County, which supports children in foster care.

Prudent was skeptical at first that the museum wanted anything more than superficial advice from the Creative Community Committee (C3), but was soon won over by the hands-on curatorial process.